The Project for the Study of Corporate Personhood

Adults make eye contact between 30% and 60% of the time in an average conversation, says the communications-analytics company Quantified Impressions. But the Austin, Texas, company says people should be making eye contact 60% to 70% of the time to create a sense of emotional connection, according to its analysis of 3,000 people speaking to individuals and groups. One barrier to contact is the use of mobile devices for multitasking. Among twentysomethings, “it’s almost become culturally acceptable to answer that phone at dinner, or to glance down at the baseball scores,” says Noah Zandan, president of Quantified Impressions. (A common feint, texting while maintaining eye contact, not only is difficult but also comes off as phony.)

The Decline of Eye Contact - WSJ.com (via infoneer-pulse)

(via teachingliteracy)

Source The Wall Street Journal

Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse

Your employer pays you in cash, because there are no electronic payments. Which is just as well, really, because you need cash. There are no automated payments such as direct debits, so you pay all your household bills in cash. Credit and debit cards are no longer accepted anywhere, so you buy all your shopping and petrol for your car with cash. You can’t make phone or internet purchases.

If you have more than one account, you can’t transfer money between your accounts. If only one of your accounts has ATM access, once that account is empty, you are stuck with no money.

Coppola Comment: The broken Euro (via iamdanw)

(via iamdanw)

Reblogged from Dan W, Software Developer

The Internet is a surveillance state. Whether we admit it to ourselves or not, and whether we like it or not, we’re being tracked all the time. Google tracks us, both on its pages and on other pages it has access to. Facebook does the same; it even tracks non-Facebook users. Apple tracks us on our iPhones and iPads. One reporter used a tool called Collusion to track who was tracking him; 105 companies tracked his Internet use during one 36-hour period.

This is ubiquitous surveillance: All of us being watched, all the time, and that data being stored forever. This is what a surveillance state looks like, and it’s efficient beyond the wildest dreams of George Orwell.

Opinion: The Internet is a surveillance state - CNN.com (via new-aesthetic)

(via new-aesthetic)

Reblogged from The New Aesthetic

I don’t want to be a designer, a marketer, an illustrator, a brander, a social media consultant, a multi-platform guru, an interface wizard, a writer of copy, a technological assistant, an applicator, an aesthetic king, a notable user, a profit-maximizer, a bottom-line analyzer, a meme generator, a hit tracker, a re-poster, a sponsored blogger, a starred commentator, an online retailer, a viral relayer, a handle, a font or a page. I don’t want to be linked in, tuned in, ‘liked’, incorporated, listed or programmed. 
I don’t want to be a brand, a representative, an ambassador, a bestseller or a chart-topper. I don’t want to be a human resource or part of your human capital.

I don’t want to be an entrepreneur of myself.

The anti-preneur manifesto | Adbusters Culturejammer Headquarters (via iamdanw)

(via iamdanw)

Reblogged from Dan W, Software Developer

journo-geekery:

Each Open App, Mouse Click & Keyboard Hit During 2.5 Years - information aesthetics
Original:  Every Day of my Life by digital artist Marcin Ignac.
Infosthetics summarizes:

Each horizontal line represents a single day, while each block stands for a specific use of the computer, such as the color of the most foreground app running at a given moment, a mouse click (red poster), or a keyboard hit (yellow poster). Accordingly, black areas are those periods when the computer is turned off. 

journo-geekery:

Each Open App, Mouse Click & Keyboard Hit During 2.5 Years - information aesthetics

Original:  Every Day of my Life by digital artist Marcin Ignac.

Infosthetics summarizes:

Each horizontal line represents a single day, while each block stands for a specific use of the computer, such as the color of the most foreground app running at a given moment, a mouse click (red poster), or a keyboard hit (yellow poster). Accordingly, black areas are those periods when the computer is turned off. 

(via notational)

Source infosthetics.com

Reblogged from JournoGeekery

A new generation of parents is now taking solutions from the workplace and transferring them home. From accountability checklists to family branding sessions, from time-shifting meals to more efficient conflict resolution, families are finally reaping the benefits of decades of groundbreaking research into group dynamics. The result is a bold new blueprint for happy families.

Run Your Family Like a Business - WSJ.com (via iamdanw)

(via iamdanw)

What if we could receive real-time feedback on our social interactions? Would unbiased third party monitors be better suited to interpret situations and make decisions for the parties involved? How might augmenting our experience help us become more aware in our relationships, shift us out of normal patterns, and open us to unexpected possibilities? I am developing a system like this for myself using Amazon Mechanical Turk. During a series of dates with new people I meet on the internet, I will stream the interaction to the web using an iPhone app. Turk workers will be paid to watch the stream, interpret what is happening, and offer feedback as to what I should do or say next. This feedback will be communicated to me via text message.

social turkers, project by Lauren McCarthy. (via new-aesthetic)

(via new-aesthetic)

Reblogged from The New Aesthetic

sunfoundation:

Every Day of My Life

Every Day of My Life is a visualization of my computer usage statistics from the last 2.5 years. Each line represents one day and each colorful block is the most foreground app running at the given moment. Black areas are periods when my computer is not turned on. Seeping patterns (or lack of them) and time of holidays and travel (longer gaps) can be therefore easily identified.

sunfoundation:

Every Day of My Life

Every Day of My Life is a visualization of my computer usage statistics from the last 2.5 years. Each line represents one day and each colorful block is the most foreground app running at the given moment. Black areas are periods when my computer is not turned on. Seeping patterns (or lack of them) and time of holidays and travel (longer gaps) can be therefore easily identified.

Reblogged from Dataviz by Sunlight